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Chateau Hotel Spa and B&B near Pézenas, in Languedoc

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Towns

Montpellier: a city to fall in love with

If you could be in love with a city, it would be Montpellier for me.
Montpellier: a city to fall in love with

If you could be in love with a city, it would be Montpellier for me. I could write an entire blog just about Montpellier if I lived there. The instant Mediterranean vibe, the historical centre with its narrow streets, the numerous, cosy squares hosting the best terraces, the countless cool restaurants and bars, and so much more. I love it!!

Majestic arc
Somehow I always enter Montpellier via the majestic Arc de Triomphe. Not a bad way to start your Montpellier visit. The Arc de Triomphe dates back to 1691 when it was built to honour the Sun King Louis XIV. The arch is an extension of the Peyrou Promenade with its remarkable water tower and statue of Louis XIV mounted on a horse. The terraces of Peyrou are well-known for the gorgeous view of the region. Coming from the Arc de Triomphe, I automatically continue on the Rue Foch, the royal lane of Montpellier. After passing the Palais de Justice, another historic monument, you will find lots of high-end shops in Haussmannian style buildings.
 


Unicorns
No shopping for me today, I prefer to start the day with a cup of tea on one of the lovely terraces in my favourite square “Place de la Canourgue”. This is the oldest square in Montpellier, and, as such, this beautiful haven of peace and tranquillity is picture-perfect. It is exactly how I picture living in France: sipping my tea and eating a croissant under the rustle of the leaves, while listening to the French surroundings. Aaaah, c’est beau la vie! Continuing my way on the Place de la Canourgue, I pass the Fountain of the Unicorns (Fontaine des Licornes). My 11-year-old girl is completely into unicorns. So whenever she is with me, this is a must-see.
 

Clear blue sky
The fountain also gives me a gorgeous view of my next destination: Saint-Pierre Cathedral. Walking to the cathedral always makes me feel like the clocks have stopped ticking. All of a sudden the impressive cathedral rises in front of me. Saint-Pierre became a cathedral in 1536, after being the chapel of Saint Benedict’s monastery. It is the only medieval church that survived the Wars of Religion between 1562 and 1598. Two gigantic cylindrical pillars with a diameter of 4.5 meters mark the impressive portal at the main entrance. The facade goes very well with the clear blue sky in the background!
 


Labyrinth
One of the things I like so much about Montpellier is that you can get lost in the historical centre, also known as L’Ecusson. I have visited the city countless times, but I still don’t know my way through the labyrinth of little streets. I don’t mind though, as I always come across new things. This is also how I discovered “Le Quartier de l’Ancien Courrier”. Situated between Place Martyrs de la Résistance and Place Saint-Roch, this labyrinth within a labyrinth will lead you to unique little shops and restaurants with teeny tiny terraces.
 


Mr BMX
Even though Montpellier is quite a big city, the 7th biggest in France, you will still find plenty of places where the crowds don’t go. Walking through these quiet old streets in the historical centre always calms me down. If you take the time to look up, you will see beautiful buildings. Now and then I see a BMX bike popping out of a wall. Rather curious about what these could be, I soon enough discovered that they are the work of artist Monsieur BMX. Drawn to street art and graffiti, he decided to actually hang real BMX bikes on the old city walls instead of spray painting them. Once you’ve noticed one, you’ll see them everywhere in the city.
 


Meeting point
Finally, I arrive at Montpellier’s central meeting point: la Place de la Comédie. One of the most eye-catching buildings in the square is the municipal theatre with its monumental façade. Hence the name of the square. If you’re not busy looking at people or watching the street artists, you might want to take a look around you. The square is surrounded by the most beautiful 19th-century buildings. The great thing about this square is that no cars are allowed, which is the true for the whole historical centre. So you can stroll around all you like, absorbing the bustling city life. Yeah, life is good in the South of France. And even better in Montpellier!
 


Good to know
Montpellier is a city you can visit year-round. Spring and Autumn are my favourite seasons to visit this city. The main tourist information office is right at the end of La Place de la Comédie and offers a lot of information as well as guided tours.

Parking
Coming from the A75 or A9, I normally park my car in the EFFIA parking lot called “Montpellier Arc de Triomphe”. From here, you can easily walk into the city.

Office de Tourisme
30 Allée Jean de Lattre de Tassigny
34000 Montpellier
+33 (0)4 67 60 60 60
Visit website
 
This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit: https://laramoneta.com/
Towns

The must-see highlights of fascinating Sète

Created as a maritime outlet for the Canal du Midi in 1666 and now one of the most important fishing port on the French Mediterranean sea, Sète has a down-to-earth vibe.
The must-see highlights of fascinating Sète


Created as a maritime outlet for the Canal du Midi in 1666 and now one of the most important fishing port on the French Mediterranean sea, Sète has a down-to-earth vibe. However, this seaside town also has a more romantic side and is known as the ‘Venice of Languedoc’ because of its many canals. So let me take you on a closer exploration of Sète to discover its true soul.

Mont Saint-Clair
Our first stop is on the top of Mont Saint-Clair to get the best overview of Sète. If you’re feeling energetic, you can walk up to the summit from the town centre in a fair hike that takes about half an hour. However, you can also drive up if this is too much activity. The town stretches up the flanks of this modestly sized hill of 183 metres. From the top, you can gaze out over the Med on your right and the Thau lagoon on your left. Sète will unfold right in front of you, with Le Môle Saint-Louis and its lighthouse clearly visible. If you look closer, you can even spot the quaint district of ‘Pointe Courte’ in the distance. Climbing the steps to the rectory’s roof terrace next to the church will also give you a breathtaking 360-degree view of the region.
 


Chapel and maritime cemetery
Since you’re already at Mont Saint-Clair, it’s worth taking a peek into the Notre-Dame-de-la-Salette Chapel. This humble little church, built in 1861, has played a significant role in many fishermen’s families’ lives. Inside, you will find brightly coloured frescoes and murals that represent their life at sea. A bit below the summit is another important landmark in Sète’s history: the cimetière marin, or the maritime cemetery. Here, melancholic thoughts flutter upon the wind and over the final resting places of fishermen and locals that overlook the Mediterranean sea. Two of Sète’s famous sons are buried here: poet Paul Valéry and actor/theatre director Jean Vilar.
 


Town centre
Although the town is medium-sized, you can easily spend a couple of hours roaming the streets of Sète. There are lovely shops, yummy restaurants and funky street art to check out. The actual town centre with most of the shops and restaurants is centred between the Place Aristide Briand and the square in front of the town hall on Rue Paul Valéry. Although you will also find a lot of restaurants and shops along the Quai Général Durand. Don’t miss out on the covered market Les Halles on Rue Gambetta! You can expect a lot of fish, oysters and other shellfish here, but there is more. If you want to buy good Italian food, this is the place to go, as many Sètois have Italian blood flowing through their veins. They say that you’re only a real Sètois if you have Italian ancestors.
 


Canals
Sète is a town of traders and fishermen, and the water has played an important role ever since the town was built in 1666. The famous Canal du Midi, created by Paul Riquet to connect the Mediterranean sea with the Atlantic, ends in the Étang de Thau. The town of Sète and its maze of canals arose to link the Thau lagoon with the sea. The arrival of the fishing port also meant the birth of a local tradition. In the middle of the summer, the ‘joutes’ event takes place. Sète organised its first water jousting tournament on the 29th of July 1966 to celebrate the foundation of the port. This spectacular event is still held annually in August during the ‘Fête de Saint Louis’. Even today, water jousting is more than just a tradition, folklore and sport. Therefore it really reflects the soul of the inhabitants of Sète.
 


Lighthouse
The lighthouse proudly stands at the end of Le Môle Saint-Louis, Sète’s pier. This pier was the town’s first major construction project when building Sète back up in the 17th century. The Phare Saint-Louis originates from around 1680. Unfortunately, German mines destroyed the lighthouse in 1944 during World War II. It was eventually reconstructed in 1948. Hence the date above the entrance. At the tiny tourism sub-office downstairs, you can buy a ticket to climb the 126 steps of the beautiful spiral staircase. At the top, you will have a magnificent 360-degree view of Sète, including Mont Saint-Clair.
 


Pointe Courte
This small fishermen’s neighbourhood lies in the north of Sète, between the Canal Royal and the Étang de Thau lagoon. Ever since the mid 19th century, the primary means of income for this area has consisted of fishing and oyster farming. After Sète’s railway was developed, a few strips of wasteland connected to the Étang de Thau were left. So this was the perfect spot for fishermen to build sheds to store their fishing nets, create a small port and in the end to settle with their families. And that is what this neighbourhood is still about, if you take the time to absorb the many magical still lifes of drying fishing nets and traps. If it was the decor for a movie, you would say it was overdone. But here at La Pointe Courte it is just part of life, which makes it such a magical place.
 


Good to know
Sète is a lovely seaside town that can be visited year-round. It has an important fishing port, which gives the town a lively vibe. The many canals and the omnipresence of water have given Sète its nickname 'Venice of Languedoc'. Although the city is medium-sized, you can easily spend a couple of days exploring its many fascinating facets.

Parking
Parking can be challenging in Sète. There are three paid parking lots, two along the Quai Général Durand (FeliCittà Parc and Parking Canal-Halles) and one along the Rue Jean Jaurès (Parking des Halles). Another option might be to park your car on Le Môle Saint-Louis, which is a bit further out of town, but a nice walk. In the summer, you can park for free at the Mas Coulet parking lot and take the- also free- 'bateaux bus' (boat bus) to the town centre.

Office de tourisme
Grand'rue Mario Roustan
34200 Sète
+33 (0)4 99 04 71 71
Visit website
 
This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit: https://laramoneta.com/
Towns

A local’s guide to Béziers for first time visitors

Things are happening in Béziers! This hidden South of France gem has recently been polished and is now an even more pleasant town in which to spend some time.
A local’s guide to Béziers for first time visitors

Things are happening in Béziers! This hidden South of France gem has recently been polished and is now an even more pleasant town in which to spend some time. Whether you love strolling through picturesque little streets, having a glass of wine at one of the many terraces or indulging your curiosity for French history: it’s all here. Let me guide you through one of the oldest cities in France. I warn you, this list is just the beginning… There is so much more to discover!

Place Jean Jaurès
The starting point of my walk through Béziers is La Place Jean Jaurès, which had a complete makeover in 2018. This big square is now a beautiful and spacious place where people come to flaunt. It’s also the meeting point for kids to cool down and play in the fountain, which consists of 50 little spurts of water that pop up unexpectedly to increase the fun. When the Summer nights fall, it gets even cooler with colourful lights and a music fountain show. All this under the watchful eye of Pierre-Paul Riquet’s statue.
 


Les Allées Paul Riquet
La Place Jean Jaurès automatically leads me to Les Allées Paul Riquet. Born in Béziers, Pierre-Paul Riquet was the creator of the 240 kilometres long waterway of the Canal du Midi that connects the Mediterranean Sea with Toulouse. On one end you will find a 32 meter high Ferris wheel and on the other side proudly stands Béziers’ Municipal Theatre. If you walk to the back of the theatre, you can spot one of the city’s amazing trompe-l’oeils.
 


Place de la Madeleine
On to La Place de la Madeleine. This square was named after the Romanesque Madeleine Church, mentioned for the first time in 1092. The building on the left with the restaurants is one of the most picturesque images of Béziers if you ask me. It’s hard to believe that this peaceful square once was the scene of the bloodiest episode in Bézier’s history. In 1209, crusaders of the Albigensian crusade brutally massacred thousands and thousands of inhabitants of the town. Men, women and children had come to the church to seek refuge, but instead of being protected, they were burned to death. The scars of this awful event are still visible to this day.
 


Les Halles de Béziers
Another place in Béziers that has had a makeover is Les Halles. This covered market still has its original cast-iron building in Baltard style and dates from 1891. Open from Tuesday to Sunday (so closed on Mondays), and from 07h00 to 13h30, this is a fantastic place to find loads of local produce. It isn’t as big as Les Halles in Narbonne, but you can still find an excellent selection of seafood, cheeses, meat and vegetables. There are several restaurants in and around Les Halles, so it also makes a great stop for lunch. A few of my favourites are ‘Hallegria’ and ‘La Gargote des Halles’ inside the market and ‘Le Massilia’ just outside.
 


Saint-Nazaire Cathedrale
One of Béziers’ landmarks is the Saint-Nazaire Cathedral. As Béziers sits on a rocky spur, you can already see the cathedral from afar. Like so many other monuments, the Saint-Nazaire Cathedral has known rough times as well. Dating from the 10th century, it was heavily damaged during the 12th-century crusade. My little city guide of Béziers ends here, at the terrace in front of the cathedral, gazing over the great Orb plain as far as the Haut-Languedoc Regional National Park. However, as I mentioned earlier, there is a lot more to discover in bustling Béziers. Check this link to read more of my posts about this surprising town. From the Nine Locks of Fonseranes to a Summer night in Béziers and from the best restaurants to some great hotels, you will find it all here. And more will follow!
 

Good to know
Béziers is a great surprise find and can be visited year-round. Although not as touristy as more popular South of France towns, like Carcassonne and Pézenas for example, the best time to visit temperature-wise is in Spring or Autumn. You can easily spend a whole day seeing the main highlights or stay longer to really get to know this unique and beautiful town.

Parking
Two of my best parking spots are the paid parking lot on Place Jean Jaurès and the one on Place de la Madeleine, also called ‘Parking Les Halles 1’. Both parking lots are in the middle of the city centre and a perfect starting point for your stroll through Béziers.

Office de Tourisme
Place du Forum
34500 Béziers
+33 (0)4 99 41 36 36
Visit website
 
This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit: https://laramoneta.com/
Towns

Discovering the heart of La Cité of Carcassonne

Visiting the medieval fortified citadel at Carcassonne in the spring is the best time if you ask me.
Discovering the heart of La Cité of Carcassonne

Visiting the medieval fortified citadel at Carcassonne in the spring is the best time if you ask me. The summer is definitely the peak-season, during those months La Cité is on the must-see list for many many more people. During my visit in June, I could still discover the historic citadel at a leisurely pace. If you look further than the obvious tourist traps, you will appreciate its charm. Find out more about this beautiful walled town in part 2 of La Ramoneta’s guide to Carcassonne. (Click here for part 1).

Fortified town
The citadel of Carcassonne dates back a long time. Already by the third century A.D., the Romans had made a fortified town out of the pre-existing Gaulish settlement. On this visit, I entered the citadel through the main gateway: “La Porte Narbonnaise”. Small cobbled streets led me to the Saint-Nazaire Basilica. It was like stepping several centuries back in time.
 


Basilica
The Basilique Saint-Nazaire’s origins are Roman, dating back to the twelfth century. By the end of the thirteenth century, the cathedral was enlarged in a Gothic style. In 1803, the cathedral became a church, giving its title to the Saint-Michel church situated in the Bastide on the other side of the Aude River. Nowadays you can still admire the mixture of Romanesque and Gothic architecture.
 


Place Auguste Pierre Pont
From the Saint-Nazaire Basilica, I continued my walk to the Place Auguste Pierre Pont. I really loved the house right on the corner where the rue du Four and rue Saint-Louis meet. You can feel history in the air. In the summer, this modest square becomes a stage for street artists. And you might even meet a real knight...
 


Castle of the Counts
After a short stop for an ice cream, I arrived at the citadel’s castle. As one of the biggest fortified cities in Europe, the citadel of Carcassonne couldn’t go without a proper château. Le Château Comtal was built in the thirteenth century by the Viscounts of Carcassonne. You can visit the castle by paying an entrance fee. Once inside, you can climb even higher and walk on the castle walls. With good weather, you can see as far as the Pyrenees.
 


Good to know
You can visit the citadel, or la Cité, of Carcassonne year-round. Entrance to the citadel itself is free; only the castle has an entrance fee. Summer can be jam-packed, the best time to visit is in spring and autumn.

Parking
If you enter the citadel by the Nabonnaise gate, you will be directed to a paid parking lot (P1 at Chemin de Montlegun). From there, just follow the signs to the Cité. If you want to enter the citadel by the Aude gate, follow the signs for Carcassonne centre and then P2 (Rue Dujardin Beaumetz), which is also fee-paying.
 
Office de Tourisme
Impasse Agnes de Montpellier
11890 Carcassonne
+33 (0)4 68 10 24 30
Visit website
 
This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit : https://laramoneta.com/
Towns

The best tips for spending a day in Narbonne

Narbonne is a lively, medium-sized town in the South of France which claims to have 3,000 hours of sunshine per year.
The best tips for spending a day in Narbonne

Narbonne is a lively, medium-sized town in the South of France which claims to have 3,000 hours of sunshine per year. That shouldn’t be your only reason to visit this lovely town though, as you can easily spend a day happily roaming the historic streets. Every street corner reveals interesting remnants of its 2,500 years of history. And all this at a leisurely, walkable distance.

Les Halles
It’s always a pleasure visiting charming Narbonne. Coming from the A9 highway, I usually enter the town via the Quai Victor Hugo where you can find free parking, if you are lucky. Crossing the Pont de la Liberté gives you a postcard-view of Narbonne. From here, I can see the Palais des Archevêques peeking above the plane trees and the colourful houses on the Pont des Marchands reflecting in the Canal de la Robine. On the left of this canal is Narbonne’s famous covered market, simply called ‘Les Halles‘. This Baltard-style cast-iron building is a must-visit for foodies and has been since 1901!
 


Palais des Archevêques
Walking toward the Place de l’Hôtel de Ville by following the Cours de la République will reveal the imposing Palais des Archevêques step by step. This view still impresses me after all these years of visiting Narbonne. The Archbishop’s Palace forms, together with the cathedral, the medieval heart of Narbonne and now hosts the town hall and a museum. Founded in 118 BC, Narbonne was the first Roman colony outside of Italy. An important vestige of this ancient civilisation is still visible in the middle of the square: La Via Domitia. This isn’t just a collection of stones but the Roman road which connected Italy’s Rome with Cadiz in Spain. It is also my prefered spot to enjoy an ice cream.
 


Saint-Just et Saint-Pasteur Cathedral
The Passage de l’Ancre, a most charming cobblestoned alley between the old and new palaces (Le Palais Vieux and Le Palais Neuf), brings me to the vaulted cloister of the Saint-Just et Saint-Pasteur Cathedral. This inner garden offers some welcoming shadow while admiring the many gargoyles. Since the 4th century, several religious buildings have been built on this spot. However, it wasn’t until the 13th century that the construction of today’s cathedral began. This overambitious, medieval project was never completed though, which means it has no nave. This was mainly due to defensive reasons and misfortune, like lack of resources and the plague, which spread to Narbonne in the 14th century.
 


Jardin de l'Archevêché
You can visit the vaulted cloister and admire the cathedral from the inside most days, with opening hours from 10h00 to 17h45. One tip: it is worth walking around the cathedral (via the Rue Droite and Rue Armand Gauthier) to find a small, but serene garden along the Rue Gustave Fabre. I only recently discovered this garden, called Le Jardin de l’Archevêché. And if you go up to the terrace of the garden, you will find a hidden selfie spot, right on the giant public bench. This ‘Banc Public’ was created by Lilian Bourgeat for the In Situ 2014 festival, in order to reactivate your senses. A nice place to pause a moment and reflect on my visit to Narbonne.
 


Good to know
Narbonne is a medium-sized town in the South of France, only 15 kilometres from the Mediterranean Sea. You can visit the museum inside the Palais des Archevêques daily from June to September. During the other months it is closed on Tuesdays. Buying a ticket for 6 euros (adults) also gives you access to the Donjon Gilles Aycelin, the tower on the left if you are standing facing the palace. The cathedral and vaulted cloisters are open daily from 10h00 to 17h45.

Parking
Sometimes, if you are lucky, you will find a spot at the free parking lot just before arriving in Narbonne (on Quai Victor Hugo). If you don't find a place here, you can drive further along Quai Victor Hugo for paid parking or try the Cours Mirabeau parking lot (paid as well).

Office de Tourisme
31 rue Jean Jaurès
11100 Narbonne
+33 (0)4 68 65 15 60
Visit website

This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit: https://laramoneta.com/
Towns

3 of the most beautiful villages of the Hérault

When travelling in France, you will come across many beautiful villages.
3 of the most beautiful villages of the Hérault

When travelling in France, you will come across many beautiful villages. In 1982, an association was set up to protect and promote the extraordinary heritage of the most beautiful villages of France. So, now and then, you will see a sign for “Les Plus Beaux Villages de France”, meaning that the village has passed the strict admission requirements of the Quality Committee. As a result, a village cannot call itself one of the most beautiful villages just like that! The Occitanie region has 45 of these extraordinary villages, of which 3 of them are in the region of Hérault. I cannot say which of these three charming villages is my favourite, as they all are very special!

Minerve
When you drive up the winding roads to Minerve, this amazingly beautiful spot and its stunning landscape will overwhelm you. Minerve is an ancient Cathar fortress, surrounded by gorges that eroded from where two rivers La Cesse and Le Brian come together. The village is perched on a high ridge, which offered a naturally strong defensive position to protect it. However, this position could not prevent the burning of 140 Cathars on the village square in 1210. To remember the Cathar martyrs, you will find a memorial stone with a dove carved into it near the church. When visiting, you will see that Minerve is very well-preserved, and it will take you straight back to the Middle Ages with its winding, cobbly roads. A lovely walk brings you down to the river where you can see the natural bridges and the Saint-Rustique well. After that, I suggest you end your visit with some fine wining and dining at one of the delightful restaurants.
 


Olargues
You will find the fortified village of Olargues in the middle of the South of France and the Massif Central. The village has the best of both regions- chestnut and cherry trees right next to vines and olive trees. The river Jaur almost encircles the entire village, which is why you will find so many bridges. Olargues also has a “Pont du Diable” (“Devils Bridge”), just like the famous bridge in Aniane near Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert. The legend goes that the villagers used this bridge for deals with the devil himself. The village of Olargues dates back to a long time ago. The village obtained its “City rights” in the 12th century and became, during the Middle Ages, an important economic and military town. A castle arose, together with ramparts and nine entrance gates. The actual castle no longer exists, but you can still see its bell tower and the remains of the ramparts. Stones of the ruined rampart served to construct the Saint-Laurent church.
 


Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert
The perfect time to visit medieval Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert is in spring or autumn when nature is at its best. Surrounded by the wonderful “Parc Naturel Régional du Haut-Languedoc”, this village was formed around the Gellone Abbey. Word has it that the abbey contains pieces of the True Cross, which attracted many pilgrims on the pilgrimage to Saint James’s Way. Today you will mainly encounter tourists, as Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert is a popular destination. You will find many restaurants and independent shops with local products in the centre and around the 150-year-old plane tree on Place de la Liberté. You can easily spend half a day strolling through the narrow roads of this charming village.


Good to know
In 1982, the Mayor of Collonges-la-Rouge, Charles Ceyrac, set up an association to protect and promote the extraordinary heritage of the most beautiful villages of France. Of the approximately 32,000 villages in France, 159 villages in 70 departments have been selected to be “Les Plus Beaux Villages de France”. Of these 159 villages, 45 are in Occitanie and 3 of them in Hérault.

Office de Tourisme Minerve
9 rue des Martyrs
34210 Minerve
+33 (0)4 68 91 81 43
Visit website

Office de Tourisme Olargues
Avenue de la Gare
34390 Olargues
+33 (0)4 67 23 02 21
Visit website

Office de Tourisme Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert
2 place de la Liberté
34150 Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert
+33 (0)4 67 56 41 97
Visit website

This article has been kindly supplied by La Ramoneta blog, for more great ideas of what to do and see in the Languedoc visit: https://laramoneta.com/
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